Resource Governance

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In 2016/17, during the course of my research in Cambodia, I explored micro-politics of contestation and the role of former Khmer Rouge in contesting land grabbing. Analyzing the repercussions on conflict transformation, I also paid special attention to gender dynamics at play. 

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Green Economy is a source of both hope and controversy. For some, it points the way out of permanent environmental and economic crises and promises to reconcile – a long cherished Utopia – ecology and economics. It fosters the hope that we can hang on to our current high standard of material prosperity.

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Shrinking – closing – no space: Governments across all continents villainize civil society actors. Where does their sense of threat emanate from?

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The professional NGO world is unable to reverse the major global trends. It can, however, prevent projects and policies by forging powerful alliances - and build alternatives.

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Healthy soils are crucial to human nutrition and the fight against hunger. But worldwide 24 billion tons of fertile soil is lost annually. Barbara Unmüßig calls attention to the growing threat to one of Earth’s most important resources.

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Indigenous communities in Cambodia are legally recognized and should thus have been protected by the Land Law and the Forestry Law, entitling them to communal land titles. A number of national and international instruments including the Cambodian Land Law of 2001, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the ILO Convention no. 169 on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples and the World Bank Safeguard Policy recognize both collective and individual Indigenous Peoples’ rights.

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About hbs Cambodia

The Cambodia Program of the Heinrich Böll Foundation aims at empowering local civil society actors to contribute effectively to debates on policy priorities in the governance of natural resources. Strategic partnerships are sought to initiate research and capacity building projects to inform and foster stakeholder dialogue at the local, national and regional levels. 

Particular attention is given to the situation of Cambodia’s indigenous communities whose social and cultural survival depends on their access to traditional lands and natural resources. The Heinrich Böll Foundation works in partnership with local non-governmental and academic organizations, indigenous associations and regional networks to empower female and male indigenous leaders and their communities to defend their livelihood rights and pursue self-determined development.

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