Dealing with the Past: Aspects of Trauma and Healing - A Personal Reflection by Dana Buenaobra

Her name is Net Savoen, the only survivor from the 30 women who were taken by the Khmer Rouge to be raped from dusk to dawn before being brutally murdered in Pursat Province, 1978.

Personal reflections on the conference – Dealing with the Past: Engaging in the Present

What does justice mean to the different victims of the Khmer Rouge? How can it be found outside of the courts? And can there be appropriate justice? Those are only some of the questions raised in the past days at the conference Dealing with the Past: Engaging in the Present. The leitmotif of the conference – how to deal with the past and how to make sure it will never happen again – has provided a link for discussions about genocide education, justice and the role of women in the context of the Cambodian genocide. From Monday 23rd January 2017 until Friday 27th January 2017 at META HOUSE

"Stick out your head to move forward!"

A student stands on the stage, holding a turtle in a basket. He calls his pet ‘Ninja Turtle’ as he imagines it to be a courageous fighter that stands up against bullies. In reality, the turtle spends most of its time hiding in its shell. The boy feels he has a lot in common with the turtle – he is too scared to defend a fellow classmate who is being bullied.

Justice and Reconciliation after the Khmer Rouge Regime: What has been achieved?

On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the fall of Phnom Penh, the Heinrich Böll Foundation organised a conference with the purpose of assessing the achievements and the shortcomings in Cambodia’s transitional justice process. “Justice and Reconciliation after the Khmer Rouge Regime: What has been achieved?” took place in Meta House, Phnom Penh, on 18 February 2015, and brought together researchers, lawyers, experts from a number of different disciplines as well as Khmer Rouge victims.